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Most recent edit on 2010-01-22 14:19:20 by AbbyGuinness

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Community Archaeology Projects - Preston
Between 1952 and 1954 local archaeologist Brian Hope-Taylor led a team of amateurs during the excavations of a medieval moated manor house, chapel, and associated buildings, which once stood on the grassed area by Longfield Drive. Along with evidence for the buildings themselves, many artefacts and even some burials were discovered. One of the finest finds was a bronze chalice, which fitted in with the historical records for the site, which suggests that priests lived here. This may also be how Preston got its name – 'Priest – to(w)n'.
The results of the excavations in Preston have never been fully published, and for many years the finds have been in storage in Guildford, and Brian Hope-Taylor's records in storage in Scotland! As part of a three-year Community Archaeology Project, the county archaeological unit, Heritage Enterprise, succeeded in getting Heritage Lottery Funding to run a local Community Archaeology project in Preston to find out more about this magnificent site.
On Saturday 29 March 2008 a special Community Archaeology Open Day was held at Tattenham Community Centre, on Merland Rise. The aim of the day was to introduce local people to the archaeological archive and artefacts from the excavations that took place in Preston during the 1950s. As a result the Preston Community Archaeology Project was formed.




Oldest known version of this page was edited on 2010-01-22 14:10:03 by AbbyGuinness []
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Community Archaeology Projects - Preston

Between 1952 and 1954 local archaeologist Brian Hope-Taylor led a team of amateurs during the excavations of a medieval moated manor house, chapel, and associated buildings, which once stood on the grassed area by Longfield Drive. Along with evidence for the buildings themselves, many artefacts and even some burials were discovered. One of the finest finds was a bronze chalice, which fitted in with the historical records for the site, which suggests that priests lived here. This may also be how Preston got its name – 'Priest – to(w)n'.


The results of the excavations in Preston have never been fully published, and for many years the finds have been in storage in Guildford, and Brian Hope-Taylor's records in storage in Scotland! As part of a three-year Community Archaeology Project, the county archaeological unit, Heritage Enterprise, succeeded in getting Heritage Lottery Funding to run a local Community Archaeology project in Preston to find out more about this magnificent site.


On Saturday 29 March 2008 a special Community Archaeology Open Day was held at Tattenham Community Centre, on Merland Rise. The aim of the day was to introduce local people to the archaeological archive and artefacts from the excavations that took place in Preston during the 1950s. As a result the Preston Community Archaeology Project was formed.

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